A Plane Crash: Can it Happen to Me?

Will it happen to me?

 How can it be prevented?  Can it be prevented?

 That’s it; I’m not going to travel.  I had high hopes, but I can’t risk dying or getting seriously injured!

 These may be some of the thoughts going through your head after watching the coverage of the tragic Asiana Airlines crash at

San Francisco International (SFO) this weekend.  I’ve flown in and out of SFO almost a dozen times over the past four years, and I have to say, my gut seized when I heard the news, and I immediately thought of the trip I have scheduled for Turkey in the fall.  And yes, the first two questions above flew through my head – but not the last one.  Why?  Because there are things you can do to minimize the chance of personal tragedy aboard aircraft.  Here are several that will put your mind (more) at ease about flying before you book your next trip.    

These may be some of the thoughts going through your head after watching the coverage of the tragic Asiana Airlines crash at

San Francisco International (SFO) this weekend.  I’ve flown in and out of SFO almost a dozen times over the past four years, and I have to say, my gut seized when I heard the news, and I immediately thought of the trip I have scheduled for Turkey in the fall.  And yes, the first two questions above flew through my head – but not the last one.  Why?  Because there are things you can do to minimize the chance of personal tragedy aboard aircraft.  Here are several that will put your mind (more) at ease about flying before you book your next trip.    

 

  1. Find out where your flight originates from.  If it doesn’t originate from the city you’re departing from, it’s likely the plane pilot has already been flying for at least a couple hours before he starts your nine- or ten-hour flight.  The Asiana Airlines flight originated in Shanghai, China before landing in Seoul, South Korea, and then taking off for San Francisco, California. The cause of the crash is still being investigated, but think about how fresh you would feel after driving for at least twelve hours, and you get an idea of how taxing it is for a pilot to safely land when he or she is exhausted.  Bottom line is, you’re likely to be safer on a flight that originates where you do.   

 

  1. Pay the extra money to fly with an airline that has an excellent, long-standing reputation and track-record.  I don’t want to knock Asiana Airlines, but their reps are already admitting that the pilot that may have been responsible for the crash was in training.  Before the crash, I’d never even heard of Asiana Airlines. Your safety does NOT come with a budget – so think of the premium you pay on a ticket as money well-spent on highly experienced pilots flying rigorously maintained aircraft.   

 

  1. Learn about emergency landing protocols BEFORE you board the plane.  I had a stewardess once tell me that only 25% of passengers are really listening to the pre-flight safety demonstration that’s mandatory before every take-off.  Furthermore, it’s doubtful that those passengers retain all the information shown regarding use of oxygen masks, flotation devices beneath your seat, etc.  Go to the airline website a couple days before you leave and review the safety information then, when you’re relatively relaxed and have time to think about it.  When the stewardess is providing the information before you actually take off, look around at the people NOT paying attention, and those with baggage stuffed at their feet, a baby in their lap, people possibly hung over or apparently not feeling well, etc. because these are the people who will present a challenge to your safe and speedy evacuation should the worst occur.  Knowing the condition and state of your surrounding passengers is going to be just as important to your safety during an emergency as understanding how to use your oxygen mask or where the nearest emergency exit is. 

 

Happy, and safe, travels to you all.

 

4 thoughts on “A Plane Crash: Can it Happen to Me?

  1. as tragic as plane crashes are, they can be a blessing in disguise. when there is a crash, all the arilines scramble around to recheck their planes and pilots and do safety checks, and things become safer than ever.
    tho, i wouldn’t want to be flying THIS week.

  2. Yes, but the Real message is save enough xanax for the END of the flight. Right?!
    Seriously, half of SFO runways are built on reclaimed land. the freeway is right there. i would rather land at Oakand Int’l anyday. i guess i’m saying, don’t fly out of a shit airport, and you will save yourself a lot of anxiety.

  3. Nope, the plane crash isn’t going to slow me down. What really scares me is the turboprops — people use those to much in Europe. Will rather take the train (GO Eurail!) any day.
    ps how come my picture isn’t showing up when I post? It might be a problem you can fix with WordPress

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